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Philosophy meetings & conferences

2 meetings & conferences listed in Philosophy 

The Human Sciences after the Decade of the Brain--Perspectives on the Neuro-Turn in the Social Sciences and the Humanities
Germany
03/30/2015

The Human Sciences after the Decade of the Brain--Perspectives on the Neuro-Turn in the Social Sciences and the Humanities

March 30 – March 31, 2015 Philosophy Department, Johannes Gutenberg-University of Mainz, Germany

It is now almost 25 years since the U.S. Congress authorized the then president, George Bush sr., to proclaim the decade beginning January 1, 1990 as the Decade of the Brain. This proclamation stimulated a number of initiatives that substantially benefitted neuroscience research in the following years. Alongside this rise of neuroscience and the corresponding increase of public awareness, many disciplines in the humanities and social sciences have shifted towards more brain based and evolutionary informed approaches. New research fields such as Neuroethics, Neuroeconomics, Cognitive Cultural Studies, Neuroaesthetics or even Neurotheology have gained a following. In addition to surveying the mutual interactions between the cognitive neurosciences and the social sciences and humanities, this interdisciplinary conference investigates the methodological and conceptual prospects and perils of choosing a neuroscience approach to the social sciences and the humanities. The conference aims to shed light on a broad range of epistemological, historical and sociological questions about the purported neuro-turn in the social sciences and the humanities including (but not limited to):

• How and why have brain based approaches to the social sciences and humanities developed?

• What exactly distinguishes cognitive and brain based approaches from their traditional counterparts?

• How are brain-based sub-disciplines of the traditional humanities institutionalized?

• How does research policy contribute to the development of a neuro-turn in the social sciences and the humanities?

• Are there common motives for turning to cognitive neuroscience approaches in the different disciplines of social sciences and humanities? If so, which?

• Are there any historical examples of a turn to brain based approaches in the social sciences and the humanities?

• If so, what could be learned from this history for practicing social sciences and humanities today?

• What, if anything, can the humanities and the social sciences learn from the neurosciences?

• What, if anything, can the neurosciences learn from the social sciences and the humanities?

• How does neuroscience change the social sciences and the humanities?

• How do the humanities and the social sciences change neuroscience?

Academic, Historian, Neuroscientist, Philosopher, Social Scientist
2015 Annual Conference Law, Religion, and American Healthcare
United States
Massachusetts
05/08/2015

2015 Annual Conference Law, Religion, and American Healthcare

May 8 - 9, 2015 Cambridge, Massachusetts

The Petrie-Flom Center for Health Law Policy, Biotechnology, and Bioethics at Harvard Law School is pleased to announce plans for our 2015 annual conference, this year entitled: “Law, Religion, and American Health Care.”

Religion and medicine have historically gone hand in hand, but increasingly have come into conflict in the U.S. as health care has become both more secular and more heavily regulated.  Law has a dual role here, simultaneously generating conflict between religion and health care, for example through new coverage mandates or legally permissible medical interventions that violate religious norms, while also acting as a tool for religious accommodation and protection of conscience.

This conference, and anticipated edited volume, will aim to: (1) identify the various ways in which law intersects with religion and health care in the United States; (2) understand the role of law in creating or mediating conflict between religion and health care; and (3) explore potential legal solutions to allow religion and health care to simultaneously flourish in a culturally diverse nation.

Attendance is free and open to the public, but space is limited.

Questions

Please contact Holly Fernandez Lynch, Executive Director, Petrie-Flom Center, with any questions: hlynch@law.harvard.edu, 617.384.5475.

Academic, Bioethicist, Ethicist, Health Services Researcher, Lawyer, Philosopher, Physician, Physician Researcher, Policy Analyst, Public Health Expert, Public Health Worker, Public Servant, Social Scientist