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Infectious Diseases meetings & conferences

19 meetings & conferences listed in Infectious Diseases 

Antibodies as Drugs: Immunological Scaffolds as Therapeutics
Canada
02/08/2015

Antibodies as Drugs: Immunological Scaffolds as Therapeutics

Joint with the meeting on Tumor Immunology: Multidisciplinary Science Driving Combination Therapy

February 8—13, 2015 Banff, Alberta, Canada

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

While monoclonal antibodies are now an established class of drugs in oncology and inflammation, exciting progress has been recently made on next generation, engineered therapeutic antibodies and alternative immunological scaffolds, with first examples from this class being recently approved by FDA and EMA. The symposium will review progress in this area including lessons learned in the clinic and how this can be applied to new targets and drug candidates. It will cover major areas of activity including: 1) Increasing antibody potency via antibody engineering, better engaging immune effector cells, and improvements in targeted delivery of effectors via fusion proteins and via conjugation of cytotoxic drugs; 2) Applying alternative targeting approaches to increase the therapeutic window, such as pre-targeting and site-specific antibody unmasking; 3) Novel antibodies in areas outside of oncology, including infectious diseases, neurology and chronic inflammation; 4) Engineering antibodies and scaffolds for alternative delivery routes and improved disposition; 5) Clinical progress with multi-specific antibodies; and 6) Recent advances on (i) addressing difficult targets such as GPCRs and ion channels, (ii) alternative immunological scaffolds, and (iii) novel antibody library technologies.

Immunologist, Pharmacologist, Physician Researcher
Impact of Environmental Changes on Infectious Diseases
Spain
03/23/2015

Impact of Environmental Changes on Infectious Diseases

23-25 March 2015, Sitges, Spain

Environmental changes — the manifestations of which can include loss of biodiversity and habitat, increasing atmospheric temperature, rising sea level, and climatic instability (e.g., longer and more severe periods of drought or rainfall) — are likely to affect the prevalence of various infectious diseases by making conditions more (or less) propitious for the survival of pathogens and their vectors, and by inducing mass movement of human and animal populations.

This conference will discuss the impact of current and predicted future environmental changes on infectious disease dynamics in people, wildlife, and livestock across the globe, and what actions need to be taken.

Major themes for the conference include:

• The effects of climate changes, globalization, urbanization and habitat loss on infectious disease patterns in human and animal populations.

• Socio-demographic and economic factors influencing populations and their impact on the distribution and prevalence of infectious diseases.

• Policies and mechanisms of intervention to prevent or reduce the spread of infectious diseases related to environmental change.

• Future prospects for tackling emerging and neglected diseases.

Join us on March 23 to 25, 2015 in Sitges, Spain to discuss the latest evidence on how environmental changes are impacting the distribution and prevalence of infectious diseases

Physician Researcher, Policy Analyst, Public Health Expert, Public Health Worker, Public Servant, Scientist, Veterinary Scientist
Host Response in Tuberculosis
United States
New Mexico
01/22/2015

Host Response in Tuberculosis

Joint with the meeting on Granulomas in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases

January 22—27, 2015 Santa Fe, New Mexico

Part of the Keystone Symposia Global Health Series, supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

Tuberculosis remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality globally. Control of the epidemic is hampered by limited understanding of basic processes underlying disease and protection. This symposium will focus on this basic science in humans. Our themes will include immune processes that have emerged as important for pathogenesis or protection, rather than focusing on classical compartments of the immune system. Translation of basic science advances into novel strategies to prevent and manage human tuberculosis will also be discussed. Animal models have been critical for advancing knowledge of tuberculosis pathogenesis and control. This preclinical progress will be discussed; however, we will require an emphasis of direct relevance to human tuberculosis in each presentation. The meeting will be held jointly with one on Granulomas in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases, which is also the pathologic hallmark of tuberculosis. This will provide an opportunity for learning about other granulomatous systems, particularly how this knowledge may be applied for progress in understanding tuberculosis. Our brief specific aims for this meeting are: 1) Present and discuss cutting edge tuberculosis research on host responses; 2) Foster a better understanding of human tuberculosis, even if animal models are used; and 3) Focus on gaps in knowledge about the events in natural infection, as well as vulnerability points for intervening in the infection process.

Physician Researcher
Immunity to Veterinary Pathogens: Informing Vaccine Development
United States
Colorado
01/20/2015

Immunity to Veterinary Pathogens: Informing Vaccine Development

January 20—25, 2015 Keystone, Colorado

The need for more effective vaccines to protect food animals against infectious diseases has never been greater. Pressures on food sources are predicted to reach a critical state in a few decades resulting in food shortages, especially in the developing world. While there is a long history of using vaccination to control animal diseases, the most notable success being the eradication of rinderpest, there are many important diseases for which no effective vaccines are available. Advances in genomic technologies, coupled with improved knowledge of the cellular and molecular events involved in the immune response, provide exciting new opportunities for vaccine development. However, effective exploitation of these advances needs to be based on an understanding of the immune responses that mediate effective immunity against the target pathogens. While laboratory animal models have proved invaluable in elucidating fundamental immunological principles, the results of vaccination studies have often failed to translate to larger animal species and humans. Hence, there is a need to study the target diseases in their natural hosts. Animals also provide valuable experimental models for studies of zoonotic pathogens that cause disease in both animals and humans (e.g. TB and influenza), as well as closely related pathogens that cause similar diseases in animals and humans. This meeting seeks to highlight the value of studying immune responses to infectious disease in animals not only to develop control measures for animal diseases but also to advance knowledge that may be more widely applicable for vaccine development. Understanding the immune response in veterinary species holds the promise of accelerating vaccine development for food animals, companion pets and clearly humans, directly addressing the One World, One Health concept emerging in vaccine research.

Veterinary Scientist, Virologist
Granulomas in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases
United States
New Mexico
01/22/2015

Granulomas in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases

Joint with the meeting on Host Response in Tuberculosis

January 22—27, 2015 Santa Fe, New Mexico

This meeting will address the basic mechanisms of granulomatous inflammation and will focus on several chronic inflammatory diseases in which persistent granuloma formation is the central pathogenic mechanism of disease. The meeting will run in parallel another on Host Response in Tuberculosis, and will include two joint plenary sessions where both audiences will meet together. Granulomas form when the immune system attempts to wall off substances that it perceives as foreign but is unable to eliminate. These substances include infectious organisms such as bacteria and fungi as well as other known foreign materials. In some cases however, the offending antigen is unknown as in sarcoidosis. A granuloma is therefore a special type of inflammation, typically an organized collection of macrophages that occurs in a wide variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases including schistosomiasis, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, Crohn’s disease, sarcoidosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The goal of this Keystone Symposia meeting on Granulomas in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases is to bring together researchers, clinicians, and members of the pharmaceutical industry to discuss the basic mechanics of granuloma formation, elucidate common pathogenic mechanisms, and identify novel areas of therapeutic intervention for the large number of chronic granulomatous diseases.

Physician Researcher
33rd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases
Germany
05/12/2015

33rd Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases

May 12-15, 2015 Leipzig, Germany

Join 3,000 clinicians, researchers, residents, and students who come togethe​r each year for the Annual Meeting of the European Society for Paediatric Infectious Diseases. This year, our 33rd annual meeting (ESPID 2015) will be held on May 12-15 in dynamic Leipzig, Germany.

ESPID 2015’s scientific programme will consist of a range of sessions and learning opportunities, given by some of the top experts on Paediatric Infectious Diseases. Come discover the latest developments in our fast-changing world in Leipzig in 2015.​​​

Epidemiologist, Pediatrician, Pharmacologist, Physician, Physician Researcher, Virologist
2015 TB Summit
United Kingdom
03/24/2015

2015 TB Summit

Tuesday, 24 March 2015 09:30 - Thursday, 26 March 2015 17:00 London, United Kingdom

This three day international event will explore new research into TB detection, treatments and vaccination as well as new development in controlling and preventing TB Infection.

Contact Details

Email: enquiries@euroscicon.com

Web: www.lifescienceevents.com

Phone: (+44) 07507 799380

Physician Researcher, Public Health Expert, Virologist
The Modes of Action of Vaccine Adjuvants
United States
Washington
10/08/2014

The Modes of Action of Vaccine Adjuvants

October 8—13, 2014 Seattle, Washington, USA

Meeting Summary

Globally, vaccines are the most effective medical interventions in limiting morbidity and mortality against infections. Effective vaccines are administered in a variety of formulations and include not only portions of their target but also adjuvants. Adjuvants can improve the magnitude and breadth of the immune response and immunological memory against the target and also determine the nature of the generated immune response. Almost all vaccines that are now in use include adjuvants, such as nucleic acids from the target organisms, in the case of attenuated virus vaccines, insoluble aluminum salts (alum), oil-in-water emulsions (MF-59) or formulated toll-like receptor ligands (MPL-TLR4). However, the world still lacks consistently effective vaccines against many infectious agents, tuberculosis, malaria and HIV and against cancers. Therefore much current research is devoted to identification of newer adjuvants, adjuvants that will safely induce the type of immune response that will most effectively deal with its target. In many cases the precise mode of action of the adjuvant is not known. For example the mode of action of alum, an adjuvant that has been used in vaccines since the 1930s and generates excellent antibody responses, is still inadequately understood. This conference will focus on the cell and molecular mechanisms of action of old and new adjuvants and other immunomodulatory agents and their use in various vaccines against infectious diseases and cancer.

Cell Biologist, Immunologist, Molecular Biologist, Oncologist, Physician Researcher, Virologist
16th Annual International Meeting of the Institute of Human Virology
United States
Maryland
09/14/2014

16th Annual International Meeting of the Institute of Human Virology

September 14-17, 2014 Baltimore, Maryland

IHV continues the tradition of engaging world science leaders to share cutting edge research advances - this year focusing on HIV cure, pathogenesis, basic and translational vaccine research, and collective lessons from recent conceptual advances in cancer immunology. 

Physician Researcher, Virologist
EUROGIN 2015 Congress
Spain
02/04/2015

EUROGIN 2015 Congress

Feb 4-7, 2015 Seville, Spain

The EUROGIN 2015 Congress aims at developing a full review of current scientific developments in the field of cervical cancer and human papillomavirus related diseases, raising the public health profile and increasing the need for responsible health services in this area.

The event endeavors to translate scientific and evidence-based research into clinical practice while highlighting the following aspects:

- Recent advances and updated scientific insights in HPV screening, testing and management

- The impact of HPV and associated cancers on public health

- Strategies to prevent and treat HPV related diseases

- Exchanging information on early detection, new diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and prevention strategies including screening and HPV vaccination

Speakers include international leaders from academic, government and private organizations, representatives of medical and scientific societies, as well as women's health associations who will discuss and exchange ideas on issues relevant to both individuals and public health

Gynecologist, Oncologist, Physician, Physician Researcher, Public Health Expert, Public Health Worker, Public Servant

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