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Basic Science meetings & conferences

82 meetings & conferences listed in Basic Science 

The Human Proteome
Sweden
04/24/2015

The Human Proteome

April 24—29, 2015 Stockholm, Sweden

The 2015 Symposium on The Human Proteome follows the very successful 2012 Keystone meeting in the same location in Sweden. As before, we have made every effort to present proteomics research of outstanding excellence and current scientific interest. Unlike the previous meeting, this one has a defining and topical theme: The completion of the human proteome. In fact, the date and venue are chosen, in part, because they coincides with the completion of the Human Protein Atlas, a very large undertaking to generate antibodies and localization information for all human protein coding regions. This event also coincides with the expected completion of complete proteome measurements of mammalian cells by mass spectrometry-based proteomics, which will be a major highlight of the conference and attract not only scientific but also media interest. Two sessions will be dedicated to covering the completion of human proteome, encompassing the leading researchers engaged with this important topic. Further sessions are dedicated to the rapid advances in mass spectrometric technology in proteomics. Complementing these advances, one session will deal with the analysis of intact proteins. Further topics represented are interaction proteomics and post-translational modifications. Related topics such as network analysis, crosslinking and of course conceptually novel applications of proteomics in cell biology and biomedicine will round off the program. Given the quality of the invited speakers and the breakthrough presentations, we expect the 2015 Keystone Symposium on The Human Proteome to be the scientifically most exciting event in this field.

Cell Biologist, Molecular Biologist
Mechanisms of Pro-Inflammatory Diseases
United States
California
04/19/2015

Mechanisms of Pro-Inflammatory Diseases

Joint with the meeting on Innate Immunity and Determinants of Microbial Pathogenesis

April 19—24, 2015 Olympic Valley, California

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

The field of human immunology is progressing swiftly because of progresses in basic immunology, genomics and systems biology. We propose a meeting that will put together clinical and basic scientists interested in inflammation and translational research. A particular emphasis will be given to human autoimmune and autoinflammatory diseases. We would like this meeting to educate physician-scientists at various stages of their careers.

Immunologist, Physician Researcher, Rheumatologist
Innate Immunity and Determinants of Microbial Pathogenesis
United States
California
04/19/2015

Innate Immunity and Determinants of Microbial Pathogenesis

Joint with the meeting on Mechanisms of Pro-Inflammatory Diseases

April 19—24, 2015 Olympic Valley, California

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

In 2000, a Keystone Symposia meeting on Determinants of Immune Defense Against Microbial Infections was held, and received outstanding reviews. At the time, this meeting met an unmet scientific need—a small interactive gathering for those interested in microbial immunology from the perspective of gaining insight into basic immune mechanisms, understanding microbial pathogenesis and developing preventative and therapeutic interventions. We have been urged by some of the more than 300 attendees of that meeting to repeat and update this meeting, as the topic is ever more timely with the emergence of drug resistant organisms, the advances in immunology, the insights gained from understanding the normal and disease microbiome, and the rapid technologic advances including high throughput sequencing and robotics. This meeting will focus on innate and adaptive immunity to microbial infections. Microbial infections pose major health problems worldwide, but also represent extraordinary models to study immune regulation. Important advances in immunology have been made in recent years and have led to a new understanding of host-pathogen interactions. This conference will explore the interaction of the innate and adaptive immune response in the host defense against microbial infection. Topics include: Innate Immunity, Innate Immune Sensing and Consequences in Microbial Infection, Innate Immunity in Inflammation and Disease, Adaptive Immunity, Regulation of Immune Responses, Immune Mechanisms in Inflammation and Infection, Intervention/Vaccines, and Targets for Immunotherapy. This meeting aims to bring together immunologists who study basic mechanisms and those that study infectious agents to formulate new strategies to control some of the world’s most deadly diseases.

Immunologist, Microbiologist, Physician Researcher, Public Health Expert, Virologist
Beige and Brown Fat: Basic Biology and Novel Therapeutics
United States
Utah
04/17/2015

Beige and Brown Fat: Basic Biology and Novel Therapeutics

April 17—22, 2015 Snowbird, Utah

The epidemic of obesity and diabetes has become a world-wide health risk. These metabolic disorders are a direct threat to the health and economic well-being of many nations. Unfortunately, education about diet and exercise are not sufficient to meet this emergency and new therapies are badly needed. Brown fat has emerged as one of the few genuinely new approaches to these problems. Brown fat exists in most or all adult humans and can dissipate caloric energy and improve both obesity and diabetes in experimental animals. This meeting will focus on new pathways controlling brown fat development and thermogenesis. We will delve into the types of brown fat cells, beige, classical brown and others. We will also put a special emphasis on emerging approaches, both biological and chemical, that can manipulate these cells for therapeutic purposes. It is our hope and belief that this meeting can nucleate expanded efforts in both academia and pharma to explore this promising research area. There has not been a Keystone Symposia conference dedicated to brown fat. While there has been a session here and there at the Obesity meeting, the science and the biomedical needs warrant this new and focused conference. Of course, this will also bridge the Obesity and Diabetes communities, and lead to pharma/academic collaborations.

Biologist, Cell Biologist, Molecular Biologist, Physician Researcher
Neural Control of Metabolic Physiology and Diseases
United States
Utah
04/12/2015

Neural Control of Metabolic Physiology and Diseases

April 12—17, 2015 Snowbird, Utah

The central nervous system, including the hypothalamus in particular, is important for the control of energy balance and metabolic homeostasis. Current research continues to generate important new understanding of the molecular, cellular, and neural mechanisms underlying this control. From a disease perspective, dysregulation of these processes appears to be crucial for the development and progression of the metabolic syndrome- including obesity, glucose intolerance/diabetes and hypertension- as well as the pathogenesis associated with aging. Recent research has begun to define and characterize the neural pathways involved in these processes. This symposium will bring together breaking research advances from both the basic science and translational realms, including new knowledge of neural circuits, plasticity and signaling, as well as insights into roles for hypothalamic/brain pathways in disease development. Also importantly, several new areas will be addressed, including state-of-art technologies for neuroscience research, adult neural stem cells, neural degeneration, microglia, aging, and related alterations of metabolic resilience.

Neuroscientist, Physician Researcher, Physiologist
Epigenomics
United States
Colorado
03/29/2015

Epigenomics

Joint with the meeting on DNA Methylation

March 29—April 3, 2015 Keystone, Colorado

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

Heritable, covalent modifications to DNA and histone proteins play an important role in an organism’s development and survival. Such epigenetic mechanisms have been increasingly linked to risks to a broad spectrum of human diseases. However, the exact function of epigenetic marks in development and disease pathogenesis remains to be better understood. Empowered by recent technological advances in DNA sequencing technologies, epigenetic regulatory mechanisms have been investigated in a growing number of organisms at increasingly high resolution and scope. The results are an explosion in new genomic technologies, large-scale datasets and computational resources. The growing research field is now referred to as “epigenomics”. Epigenomics is still a young and growing field, and there are many challenges to investigators working on specific model organisms or disease who want to adopt this approach. This meeting is designed to capture the recent progresses in the field in the same time bridge the technological gaps in the field, such as datasets availability, method adoption, data interpretation.

Molecular Biologist
DNA Methylation
United States
Colorado
03/29/2015

DNA Methylation

March 29—April 3, 2015 Keystone, Colorado

Joint with the meeting on Epigenomics

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

DNA methylation is essential for mammalian development and plays an important regulatory role in many organisms including plants. Major advances have been made in functionally studying the key players involved in establishing and maintaining DNA methylation as well as mapping its genome-wide location. Many gaps remain towards a complete understanding in particular in diseases. In this meeting experts in the field will provide the latest insights from plants to mammalian development. A further focus will be its relevance for cancer biology and how it may lead to more advanced diagnostics and treatments in the clinic.

Molecular Biologist, Scientist
T Cells: Regulation and Effector Function
United States
Utah
03/29/2015

T Cells: Regulation and Effector Function

March 29—April 3, 2015 Snowbird, Utah

T lymphocytes play a pivotal role in the immune system of vertebrate animals as a key regulatory and effector cell type. Recently, a remarkable progress has been made in the understanding of molecular and cellular mechanisms of differentiation and activation of T lymphocytes and in the elucidation of diverse functional T cell subsets and their biological roles in a variety of physiological and pathological settings. This meeting will bring together leading investigators from the academia and industry studying diverse aspects of T cell biology. The overarching goal of this broadly themed meeting is to facilitate development of a synthetic view of increasingly complex mechanisms of T cell differentiation and function and of interactions between diverse types of T lymphocytes and other cells of the immune system in health and disease. By attracting a diverse array of scientists and students this integrative meeting will cover a wide array of topics and stimulate discussions and interactions, and foster collaborations.

Cell Biologist, Molecular Biologist
Transcriptional and Epigenetic Influences on Stem Cell States
United States
Colorado
03/23/2015

Transcriptional and Epigenetic Influences on Stem Cell States

March 23—28, 2015 Steamboat Springs, Colorado

An ambitious goal in modern biology is to understand stem cell states. Although much is known about both the behavior of stem cells under various conditions and the molecular details of stem cell identity, there is a gap between these two bodies of knowledge. This meeting sets out to bridge this gap, with a focus on transcriptional and epigenetic control of stem cell function. Advances in these areas will enable us to devise new strategies not only to probe stem cell biology more deeply, but to model disease and to develop cellular therapies. This Keystone Symposia meeting will bring together researchers who strive to: 1) Describe transcriptional and epigenetic mechanisms that control specific stem cell behaviors; 2) Generate predictive models of stem cell fate determination; 3) Delineate the influence of cell cycle and signaling on stem cell state; and 4) Understand mechanisms governing cell fate change, including differentiation, reprogramming and transdifferentiation. Ultimately, the meeting will provide an opportunity to view copious empirical data on stem cell behavior through a molecular lens. We will bring together scientists from very basic research fields exploring transcriptional control and chromatin modifications, but also stem cell and developmental biologists seeking to understand stem cell function in various biological contexts, as well as translational researchers thinking about developing therapies or model specific diseases. The knowledge exchanged at the meeting will accelerate the optimization of existing stem cell technologies (e.g., iPSC) and catalyze entirely novel approaches to manipulating stem cells for studying and treating disease.

Cell Biologist, Molecular Biologist, Physician Researcher
Liver Metabolism and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)
Canada
03/22/2015

Liver Metabolism and Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease (NAFLD)

Joint with the meeting on Obesity and the Metabolic Syndrome: Mitochondria and Energy Expenditure

March 22—27, 2015 Whistler, British Columbia, Canada

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

Abnormalities in hepatic intermediary metabolism are common in obesity and are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in obese people. For example, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) affects over 25% of the US population and has become the most common cause of liver failure and transplantation. NAFLD is also linked to the development of major metabolic diseases such as type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Despite the central role of the liver in whole-body energy metabolism and its contribution to disease development, there are literally no dedicated meetings that focus on the cellular and mechanistic aspects of the regulation of liver metabolism. This meeting will bring together experts, both basic scientists and clinicians, across diverse fields including biochemistry, cell biology, genetics, hepatology, nutrition, physiology and virology to exclusively focus on the liver and bridge a translational divide. Meeting themes will center on regulation of hepatic energy metabolism, crosstalk between the liver and different organs and cell types and how alterations in macronutrient metabolism contribute to disease etiology. The objectives of this conference are to: 1) Expose scientists across diverse disciplines to different aspects of hepatic metabolism and NAFLD development; 2) Find synergies in research efforts to expedite our understand hepatic energy metabolism; and 3) Explore emerging metabolic targets for therapeutic interventions to prevent or alleviate NAFLD and related comorbidities.

Biochemist, Cell Biologist, Geneticist , Hepatologist, Molecular Biologist, Nutritionist, Physician Researcher, Physiologist, Virologist

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