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Basic Science meetings & conferences

58 meetings & conferences listed in Basic Science 

Diabetes and Metabolic Dysfunction
United States
New Mexico
01/27/2015

Diabetes and Metabolic Dysfunction

Joint with the meeting on Mitochondria, Metabolism and Heart Failure

January 27—February 1, 2015 Santa Fe, New Mexico

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

Diabetes and obesity related complications and associated metabolic disorders are major public health problems at the local, national and global levels. These metabolic defects underlie the basis for multiple debilitating diseases including heart disease, stroke, blindness, kidney disease, hypertension, neural degeneration, wound healing, amputations, periodontal disease and birth defects. The proposed meeting will address several cutting edge aspects of molecular, cellular, tissue and integrative system metabolism that account for the metabolic defects that occur in diabetes and obesity. Several of these themes overlap with the joint meeting on Mitochondria, Metabolism, and Heart Failure. The concurrent sessions will address distinct and novel aspects of normal and dysregulation muscle (skeletal and cardiac) intracellular signaling, mitochondria function/dynamics, aging and energy balance. We have selected leaders in each of these respective areas that will not only address basic and integrative mechanisms in model systems, but several will address these issues in human pathology. The diabetes specific sessions reflect several key aspects of metabolic dysregulation in which novel information is currently forthcoming causing a paradigm shift in over our previous understanding of these processes. These include new information about tissue cross talk, the inter-relationship between the control of glucose production and fatty acid synthesis that underlies selective insulin resistance and the role of normal and dysregulated circadian rhythms on metabolic processes. Each of these sessions will provide unique and exciting findings that will provide the basis for new future research directions.

Endocrinologist, Physician Researcher, Physiologist
Mitochondria, Metabolism and Heart Failure
United States
New Mexico
01/27/2015

Mitochondria, Metabolism and Heart Failure

Joint with the meeting on Diabetes and Metabolic Dysfunction

January 27—February 1, 2015 Santa Fe, New Mexico

The objectives of this meeting are: 1) To mechanistically connect the fundamental biology of metabolism and mitochondrial function with the pathogenesis of heart failure, a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the world; and 2) To increase basic understanding of metabolism and mitochondrial function using observations in cardiac muscle, a traditional platform for these studies. The ongoing convergence of the cardiac metabolism and mitochondrial biology fields provides a particularly cogent rationale for a meeting with this focus. Moreover, large gaps of knowledge exist in this area such as the precise molecular signaling that connects metabolism and energy sensing with mitochondrial function, and the roles of basic mitochondrial processes (e.g. biogenesis, fission, fusion, mitophagy, maintenance of mitochondrial genome integrity) in metabolism and heart failure. These deficiencies in fundamentally important scientific knowledge and their clinical implications for a common and lethal disease confer exceptional significance on the proposed meeting. Although a number of cardiac research meetings take place each year, most are of a very general nature or so specialized that they examine only a single process in isolation. A major innovation of the proposed meeting is its ability to examine metabolism, mitochondrial function, and heart failure in an integrated context and in the depth required to critically examine existing paradigms. A second significant innovation is to have the meeting run concurrently with one on Diabetes and Metabolic Dysfunction. This opportunity has been exploited by designing three of the morning sessions to be joint between the two meetings.

Cardiologist, Physician Researcher
Neuroinflammation in Diseases of the Central Nervous System
United States
New Mexico
01/25/2015

Neuroinflammation in Diseases of the Central Nervous System

January 25—30, 2015 Taos, New Mexico

SIGNIFICANCE - Neuroinflammation, the response of the central nervous system (CNS) to disturbed homeostasis, typifies all neurological diseases, from primary-inflammatory; to developmental; traumatic; ischemic; neoplastic; and neurodegenerative. Disease-associated neuroinflammatory responses aren’t evolutionarily-selected to minimize or repair tissue injury, and may be helpful, harmful or neutral. This research is promising because neuropathological, epidemiologic, genetic, animal-model and biomarker studies indicate pertinence of inflammation for neurological disease and because current and re-purposed therapeutics might beneficially modify neuroinflammation. The research is urgent because therapeutic options for these diseases are presently lacking. The meeting will: 1) Address the developmental roles of neuroinflammatory cells including microglia and blood-brain barrier (BBB) neurovascular elements; 2) Clarify how neuroinflammatory reactions mediate host defense against neuroinvasive microbial pathogens and also how the response to systemic inflammation affects the neuroinflammatory elements.; 3) Specify critically-important neuroinflammatory cells (microglia; astrocytes; NG2+ glia; BBB); receptors (Toll-like receptors; inflammasomes; cytokine receptors); signaling pathways and effector mechanisms; and 4) Identify the most salient targets of neuroinflammation (neurons; neural progenitor and stem cells; oligodendroglia) and mechanisms of injury. Neuroscientists and immunologists work on individual elements of these questions. This meeting will develop a common body of knowledge and opportunities for productive interaction, to begin maturing the field.

INNOVATION - This meeting will be the first Keystone Symposia meeting on neuroinflammation. Single-disease-focused meetings have occurred and suggest opportunities of neuroscientist/immunologist interactions. The present meeting will be the first to bring together the many communities of disease-focused neuroscientists and immunologists with an interest in the CNS. This nascent field needs a committed, interactive community and this Keystone Symposia conference promises to play a key role.

Immunologist, Neuroscientist, Physician Researcher
Immunity to Veterinary Pathogens: Informing Vaccine Development
United States
Colorado
01/20/2015

Immunity to Veterinary Pathogens: Informing Vaccine Development

January 20—25, 2015 Keystone, Colorado

The need for more effective vaccines to protect food animals against infectious diseases has never been greater. Pressures on food sources are predicted to reach a critical state in a few decades resulting in food shortages, especially in the developing world. While there is a long history of using vaccination to control animal diseases, the most notable success being the eradication of rinderpest, there are many important diseases for which no effective vaccines are available. Advances in genomic technologies, coupled with improved knowledge of the cellular and molecular events involved in the immune response, provide exciting new opportunities for vaccine development. However, effective exploitation of these advances needs to be based on an understanding of the immune responses that mediate effective immunity against the target pathogens. While laboratory animal models have proved invaluable in elucidating fundamental immunological principles, the results of vaccination studies have often failed to translate to larger animal species and humans. Hence, there is a need to study the target diseases in their natural hosts. Animals also provide valuable experimental models for studies of zoonotic pathogens that cause disease in both animals and humans (e.g. TB and influenza), as well as closely related pathogens that cause similar diseases in animals and humans. This meeting seeks to highlight the value of studying immune responses to infectious disease in animals not only to develop control measures for animal diseases but also to advance knowledge that may be more widely applicable for vaccine development. Understanding the immune response in veterinary species holds the promise of accelerating vaccine development for food animals, companion pets and clearly humans, directly addressing the One World, One Health concept emerging in vaccine research.

Veterinary Scientist, Virologist
Epigenetics and Cancer
United States
Colorado
01/25/2015

Epigenetics and Cancer

January 25—30, 2015 Keystone, Colorado

Cancer epigenetics is a new and rapidly developing area of research. This comes from the fact that many epigenetic regulators (chromatin modifying enzymes, modification reading proteins and chromatin remodeling activities) are found mutated in cancers and from the recent approval of cancer drugs targeting epigenetic enzymes. This Keystone Symposia meeting on Epigenetics and Cancer aims to bring together scientists who are interested in understanding the connections between basic epigenetic pathways and the process of cancer. One aspect of the meeting will highlight the mechanisms by which epigenetic pathways control various biological processes. Information will be presented on chromatin and DNA modifications, chromatin complexes and ncRNAs. A second aspect will revolve around the connections between epigenetic pathways and cancer. This section will highlight genetic and epigenetic changes that take place during oncogenesis and efforts to counteract cancer with small molecule inhibitors against epigenetic regulators. Our hope is to provide a forum for the interchange of information and knowhow between the two converging fields of cancer research and epigenetics.

Oncologist, Physician Researcher
Granulomas in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases
United States
New Mexico
01/22/2015

Granulomas in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases

Joint with the meeting on Host Response in Tuberculosis

January 22—27, 2015 Santa Fe, New Mexico

This meeting will address the basic mechanisms of granulomatous inflammation and will focus on several chronic inflammatory diseases in which persistent granuloma formation is the central pathogenic mechanism of disease. The meeting will run in parallel another on Host Response in Tuberculosis, and will include two joint plenary sessions where both audiences will meet together. Granulomas form when the immune system attempts to wall off substances that it perceives as foreign but is unable to eliminate. These substances include infectious organisms such as bacteria and fungi as well as other known foreign materials. In some cases however, the offending antigen is unknown as in sarcoidosis. A granuloma is therefore a special type of inflammation, typically an organized collection of macrophages that occurs in a wide variety of infectious and non-infectious diseases including schistosomiasis, histoplasmosis, cryptococcosis, Crohn’s disease, sarcoidosis, and rheumatoid arthritis. The goal of this Keystone Symposia meeting on Granulomas in Infectious and Non-Infectious Diseases is to bring together researchers, clinicians, and members of the pharmaceutical industry to discuss the basic mechanics of granuloma formation, elucidate common pathogenic mechanisms, and identify novel areas of therapeutic intervention for the large number of chronic granulomatous diseases.

Physician Researcher
PI 3-Kinase Signaling Pathways in Disease
Canada
01/13/2015

PI 3-Kinase Signaling Pathways in Disease

Joint with the meeting on Integrating Metabolism and Tumor Biology

January 13—18, 2015 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

The PI3K-Akt-mTOR signaling pathway is one of the primary mechanisms for controlling cell growth, survival, and motility in response to intracellular signaling and extracellular cues. Genetic events resulting in inappropriate activation of this pathway are common in many cancers and, as a result, are a focus of both basic cancer research and drug discovery efforts in oncology. The PI3K-Akt-mTOR network also controls diverse aspects of inflammation and adaptive immunity. Although originally modeled as an independent and linear signaling cascade, today it is evident that the PI3K pathway also functions as a central hub for cross-talk in both vertical as well as reciprocal feedback regulation with other important signaling pathways. How metabolic pathways are regulated to meet the unique needs of tumor cells and activated lymphocytes is a fertile area of study, with mounting evidence that metabolic regulation is intimately linked with the signal transduction pathways that control cell growth and proliferation. One of the exciting advances in the field is the development of new inhibitors against this pathway. However, the rationale for inhibiting individual or multiple isoforms of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling remains a subject of intense debate. This meeting aims to bring together scientists and clinicians from academia and industry to discuss the opportunities and liabilities of targeting the PI3K- and related pathways in disease, drawing on human pathophysiology and genetics, preclinical models and clinical data with PI3K pathway inhibitors. A joint meeting on Integrating Metabolism and Tumor Biology will enhance opportunities for interdisciplinary interactions.

Cell Biologist, Molecular Biologist
Integrating Metabolism and Tumor Biology
Canada
01/13/2015

Integrating Metabolism and Tumor Biology

Joint with the meeting on PI 3-Kinase Signaling Pathways in Disease

January 13—18, 2015 Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

Registered attendees of one meeting in a joint pair may participate in sessions of the other, pending space availability.

Metabolic reprogramming is a hallmark of cancer. Work in recent years has demonstrated extensive interconnectivity between oncogenic signaling pathways and intermediate metabolism. Compelling evidence indicates that signaling aberrations that drive oncogenesis trigger extensive alterations in metabolic flux; conversely, mutational alterations in certain metabolic enzymes are capable of priming cells for malignancy. These observations have raised hopes that understanding the metabolic underpinnings of cellular transformation, tumor growth and metastasis will enable more effective strategies to diagnose and treat cancer. Current challenges include understanding how best to translate observations from simple models of tumor cell growth to bona fide tumors in vivo, and understanding which aspects of dysregulated cell metabolism contribute to tumor maintenance and progression. This conference will bring together scientists from academia and industry attacking this problem on many levels. A major theme of the meeting will be exploring the crosstalk between metabolism and various other dimensions of systems biology, including epigenetics, protein function, stress responses and signal transduction. Emerging principles regarding the influence of the tumor microenvironment on cellular metabolism will be discussed in detail, as will new progress toward exploiting metabolic reprogramming to image and treat cancer. The meeting will be partnered with a one on PI 3-Kinase Signaling Pathways in Disease, providing a fertile environment for exchange of ideas between these two highly connected fields.

The Biological Code of Cell Signaling: A Tribute to Tony Pawson
United States
Colorado
01/11/2015

The Biological Code of Cell Signaling: A Tribute to Tony Pawson

January 11—16, 2015 Steamboat Springs, Colorado

Prompted by the recent loss of one of the brightest stars in the life sciences, we are planning a Keystone Symposium to honor the memory of Tony Pawson. The aim of the meeting would be to provide a forward-looking symposium rooted in his prodigious scientific legacy. It would constitute a natural evolution of previous symposia organized by him (such as the “Omics Meets Cell Biology” series and “The Evolution of Protein Phosphorylation”). As such, the scientific focus of the symposium would be on the role of post-translational modifications (PTMs), modular protein domains and signaling networks as driving forces of human evolution and disease. The cellular world that Tony, with others, unlocked consists of dynamic protein networks created through the interactions of different protein modules, which together drive almost every intra- and inter-cellular decision process we know today. His most important contribution in this field is undoubtedly his discovery of the first protein interaction module, the SH2 domain, but numerous other interaction domains followed, leading to current investigations of how the dysregulation of these networks leads to new signaling states in disease that are critical for processes in, for instance, cancer, such as tumor progression or drug resistance. The symposium will thus span the entire spectrum of fields that have been touched by Tony Pawson's prolific and inspiring research, while maintaining a strong forward-looking perspective.

Biologist, Cell Biologist, Molecular Biologist, Scientist
Viral Immunity
United States
Colorado
01/11/2015

Viral Immunity

January 11—16, 2015 Breckenridge, Colorado

The most exciting recent advances in viral immunity include the increased understanding of the role of innate immune mechanisms, interaction between innate and adaptive immunity, pathogen manipulation of host responses, activation of immune responses and immune effector functions. Despite these advances, basic mechanisms of anti-viral immunity are poorly characterized for many acute infections and less well understood for chronic infections. Efforts are also required to exploit recent research advances to improve vaccine design and therapeutic intervention. This meeting will include both innate and adaptive immunity and juxtapose animal models with human studies as it attempts to foster collaborative efforts between attending viral immunologists working in disparate systems and models. Expert talks in plenary sessions will encompass the latest advances in critical areas of viral immunity. Workshops and additional presentations will cover provocative and cutting-edge results from attendees. The overall meeting objective is to accelerate progress in understanding and manipulating anti-viral immunity to improve human health.

Immunologist, Physician Researcher

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