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22 calls for papers / publications listed in Social Science 

Call for Papers for a Theme Issue of the Journal of American Culture: Fear and Anxiety in American Culture
12/31/2015
Journal of American Culture

Call for Papers for a Theme Issue of the Journal of American Culture: Fear and Anxiety in American Culture

American fears, whether real or imagined, have never been the sole province of horror novels or movies. For generations, Americans have consistently demonstrated deep-seated fears in multiple areas of life ranging from politics, religion, economics, race, gender, literature, and the arts. Consider, for example, the changing face of monsters in American culture, whether they are identified as witches in Puritan New England or those with differing political and ideological positions in the present day. Sometimes, Americans even turn their fears into popular crusades against political platforms, popular literature and film, and causes or individuals deemed to be overly powerful or controversial. Scholars have long demonstrated that understanding the nature and purpose of fear or anxiety often requires careful study within a range of approaches, including those stemming from cultural studies, history, literature, psychology, anthropology, gender studies, and many others. In this theme issue of The Journal of American Culture, we want to examine the current state of scholarly inquiry into the place of fear and anxiety within American culture by considering questions such as: What are Americans afraid of generally? What are we afraid of right now? How are our thoughts, actions, and politics, shaped by the things we fear most? How have our fears changed over the centuries?

We welcome submissions for this theme issue from a wide variety of critical approaches and topics including, but not limited to, literature, film, history, sociology, economics, cultural studies, anthropology, monster theory, psychology, posthumanism, gender studies, and horror studies. We are especially interested in interdisciplinary work that highlights problems of fear across various media or disciplines.

Submissions, generally 15-25 pages in length, are to be original scholarly manuscripts formatted according to MLA style guidelines using in-text citations with author’s name and page number. Endnotes and works cited should appear at the end of the paper. In light of space limitations, please avoid excessive use of footnotes.

This issue will be edited by Carl H. Sederholm (csederholm@byu.edu); please direct all questions to him.

The deadline for submission is December 31, 2015, and the issue will appear in March 2017.

Academic, Behavioral Scientist, Psychologist, Social Scientist
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Japanese Economic Review: Economics of Aging in Japan and Other Societies
10/15/2014
Japanese Economic Review

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Japanese Economic Review: Economics of Aging in Japan and Other Societies

In Japan, the population is aging at the fastest pace in the world. In order to establish a sustainable social security system, it is indispensable to construct a policy infrastructure by accumulating evidence based on high-quality micro-data on the diverse aspects of the lives of elderly people. As an important part of this process, Japanese Economic Review (JER) is very pleased to announce a special issue on the economics of aging. We invite the submission of original research contributions covering all aspects, broadly defined, of the economics of aging using the Japanese Study on Aging and Retirement (JSTAR) and/or other family surveys such as:

Health and Retirement Study (HRS)

English Longitudinal Survey on Ageing (ELSA)

Survey on Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE)

Korean Longitudinal Study of Aging (KLoSA)

Chinese Health and Retirement Survey (CHARLS)

Longitudinal Aging Study in India (LASI)

Priority will be given to studies using JSTAR data.

Language: English

How to submit your papers

Submit your papers to: sawada2@e.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Deadline: By the end of October 15, 2014 (GMT)

Inquiries

Email: sawada2@e.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Academic, Policy Analyst, Social Scientist
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research: Social Work Intervention Research
11/01/2014
Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research: Social Work Intervention Research

Guest Editors: Daniel Herman, Ph.D. & Diane DePanfilis, Ph.D.

Manuscript Submission Deadline: November 1, 2014

The Journal of the Society for Social Work and Research (JSSWR) announces a special issue dedicated to studies of social work interventions.

This issue will broadly define social work interventions to include intentional action strategies designed to promote positive outcomes (or prevent adverse outcomes) among individuals, groups, organizations, or communities served by the social work profession.

Scope and Topics of Interest

While all high-quality manuscripts focused on social work intervention research will be considered, we are particularly interested in papers that describe methods and key findings of intervention studies and discuss applications to practice and/or public policy. In addition, we are seeking papers that will contribute to scholarly debate regarding the development and use of methods for carrying out intervention research. We invite both qualitative and quantitative manuscripts.

Topics of interest include, but are not limited to, the following:

• Completed experimental and quasi-experimental studies testing social work interventions;

• Studies using systematic methods to develop new interventions or to adapt existing interventions for new populations or settings;

• Studies of implementation of social work interventions;

• Methodological research on strategies for intervention research, including advances in statistical methods for analyzing dosage data and data from observational studies (where the intent is to assess the impact of a service or programfrom a quasi-experimental design).

Authors are invited to contact the guest editors to discuss ideas for submissions.

Daniel Herman, Hunter College (daniel.herman@hunter.cuny.edu)

Diane DePanfilis, University of Maryland (ddepanfilis@ssw.umaryland.edu)

Submission

All papers must be prepared for masked review by three peer reviewers.

For submission instructions and Author Guidelines, please go to JSSWR’s page on the University of Chicago Press Journals website (http://www.press.uchicago.edu/ucp/journals/journal/jsswr.html).

Note. During the submission process, make sure to identify your submission as intended for the Special Issue on Social Work Intervention Research.

Send questions regarding the submission process to JSSWR Managing Editor Diane Wyant at dwyant@email.unc.edu.

Academic, Social Scientist, Social Worker
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Human Development and Capabilities: Health and Disability
11/30/2014
Journal of Human Development and Capabilities

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Human Development and Capabilities: Health and Disability

Edited by

Sophie Mitra, Fordham University

Jennifer Prah Ruger, University of Pennsylvania

Deadline for submissions: November 30, 2014

The Journal of Human Development and Capabilities (JHDC) is pleased to announce a call for papers for a special issue on Health and Disability . This call for papers aims to advance the state of knowledge and expertise regarding health, disability and human development, as well as the linkages among them and a range of policies, institutions, and social structures that influence such links and their dynamics. Submissions related to this topic are welcome. In particular, though not exclusively, we welcome submissions in the following themes: i) Social justice and resource allocation; ii) Health system financing and access; iii) Public health and health policy; iv) Disability, poverty and human development; v) Social determinants of health and disability; vi) Disability definition and measurement; vii) HIV/AIDS and antiretroviral therapies; viii) Health care services and provision, and; ix) Maternal, child and reproductive health.

Full papers in English, in .doc or .docx formats should be submitted by November 30th, 2014. Strict compliance with this deadline is required. Papers submitted will be evaluated through a standard peer review process. Authors of the selected papers will be notified by e-mail. Submission of a paper implies that the author has the intention of publishing the paper in the JHDC, and it is not currently under evaluation at another journal.

Submission procedure

Please submit papers online at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/cjhd. According to the JHDC’s guidelines for preparing manuscripts, please send the paper identified as “Main Document”, with all information identifying the authors removed to allow it to be refereed anonymously. The main document should include the following:

-- The title of the paper.

-- An abstract of approximately 150–200 words.

-- Up to five key words.

-- Numbered pages in sequence.

-- All necessary material (e.g. figures and tables and their captions; appendices).

In addition to the main manuscript, a separate file should also be sent, identified as “Title Page”, and must include all of the following information:

-- The title of the paper

-- The names of the authors

-- The full postal and email addresses of all the authors

-- Affiliation details for each author (job title, institution, city, country)

-- A brief biographical note for each author (around 100 words)

-- One author should be indicated as “Corresponding author”. He/she will be notified of the selection outcome after submission of the manuscript to an anonymous peer review process, and if the paper is selected.

Complete instructions for authors can be found at the publisher’s website: http://www.tandfonline.com/action/authorSubmission?journalCode=cjhd20&page=instructions

For inquiries, please contact Sophie Mitra (mitra@fordham.edu) or Jennifer Prah Ruger (jenpr@upenn.edu).

Journal information

The Journal of Human Development and Capabilities is the peer-reviewed journal of the Human Development and Capabilities Association. It was launched in January 2000 to provide new perspectives on challenges of human development, capability expansion, poverty eradication, human well-being, markets, growth, social justice and human rights. The human development approach recognizes that development is about more than just economic growth; it is also about improving the well-being of people, and expanding the choices and opportunities they have.

The Journal publishes original work in economics, philosophy, social sciences and other disciplines that expand concepts, measurement tools and policy alternatives in the area of human development. It provides a forum for an open exchange of ideas among a broad spectrum of policy makers and academics, addressing issues at global, national and local levels.

The human development school of thought has become increasingly influential within academic institutions as well as within government bodies and non-governmental organizations. The Journal acts as a conduit for the further advancement and critique of this approach.

For more information about the Journal: http://www.capabilityapproach.com/Journal.php

Academic, Health Services Researcher, Policy Analyst, Public Health Expert, Public Health Worker, Public Servant, Social Scientist
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the History of Education Review: Schools and the Management of Public Health
01/31/2015
History of Education Review

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the History of Education Review: Schools and the Management of Public Health

Editors: Dr Helen Proctor and Dr Kellie Burns, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney

Schools have a long history of intervention in the health of children and adolescents. Their implication in the administration and management of public health has impacted significantly on relationships between family, school and the state, and on ideas about the role of the school in the creation of healthy, productive citizens. Understandings of health and hygiene have had ongoing and changing moral and political dimensions, and concerns about health have varied across gender, sexuality, race, social class, age and place. Further, shifting meanings of health and illness in schools have continued to reflect and produce contested views of difference.

The journal History of Education Review will publish an international special issue focusing on the historical involvement of schools in the production, management and bureaucratization of public health. A wide variety of topics related to this history will be considered, including but not limited to:

• gender and gendered understandings of the body and education

• sex, sexuality and bodily discipline

• family-school-community relations

• citizenship and governing

• colonialisation, race, assimilation and eugenics

• hygiene, vaccination and civic morality

• nutrition, food provision, obesity and healthy eating

• (early) childhood and adolescence

• parents’ role in public health programs

• communicable diseases and ideas about illness and wellness

• class, social control and the economics of public health

• changing and contested conceptions of expertise and professional knowledge around medicine, psychology, school teaching and parenting

• teachers’ health and wellbeing

• buildings, classrooms and school design.

In the first instance please submit a detailed paper proposal (1000 words maximum) to Dr Helen Proctor, Faculty of Education and Social Work, University of Sydney: Helen.proctor@sydney.edu.au, by 31 January, 2015.

Full papers (from accepted proposals) will be due 31 January, 2016.

The History of Education Review is an international journal committed to the publication of high-quality, peer-reviewed research and theoretical papers located in the history of education. It is the official journal of the Australian and New Zealand History of Education Society (http://www.anzhes.com).

Full author guidelines for the journal can be found at http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=her.

Enquiries regarding this special issue of History of Education Review may be directed to Dr Helen Proctor: helen.proctor@sydney.edu.au.

Academic, Health Services Researcher, Historian, Public Health Expert, Public Health Worker, Public Servant, Social Scientist
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Drugs: Education, Prevention, and Policy: The Normalisation Thesis – 20 years Later
12/01/2014
Drugs: Education, Prevention, and Policy

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Drugs: Education, Prevention, and Policy: The Normalisation Thesis – 20 years Later

Editors: Fiona Measham (guest editor) & Amy Pennay

Over the past 20 years, a growing body of literature has debated whether the regular, recreational use of some drugs, such as cannabis and ecstasy, has become ‘normalised’ amongst young people. The original proponents of this thesis argued that the recreational use of some drugs had become a normal, common feature of life for some young people in their pursuit of leisure and pleasure. They also argued that the use of some drugs had become socially and culturally accepted by many members of the non-drug using population (Measham et al., 1994; Parker et al. 1998).

The normalisation thesis is one of the most significant recent theoretical developments to have emerged in the youth and drug studies literature, because it differed from previous criminological and psychological theories that associated drug use with deviance or resistance, subcultural affiliation, and pathology or disease. Instead, it aimed to explain why there was such an increase in recreational drug use among people of different gender, class and ethnicity.

The normalisation thesis has been debated by researchers in the UK, other parts of Europe, Australia and New Zealand. Some of this work has supported the normalisation thesis, while some has contested it. More recent work has explored concepts such as differentiated normalisation and the micro-politics of normalisation. This special issue of Drugs: Education, Prevention and Policy will explore current developments in the normalisation thesis, particularly in the context of fairly stable trends in illicit drug use in western countries.

Manuscripts are encouraged that examine normalisation, and also de-normalisation, either through drawing on newly collected empirical data or providing critical reflection of facets of the theory in light of social or cultural shifts in drug use. We encourage manuscripts that address a range of licit and illicit drug types (i.e., emerging psychoactive/synthetic drugs, cannabis and e-cigarettes, as just a few examples). We hope to include a variety of different types of articles, as described in the Drugs: Education, Prevention, and Policy's Instructions for Authors, available at the journal's website, and we encourage submissions from a diverse range of authors, i.e., more experienced and junior researchers and researchers from developing and developed countries. 

Submission process: Potential authors should submit a 500-1000 word proposal. Guest Editors for the Special Issue will review the proposals and invite selected authors to submit a full manuscript, subject to peer review. Submissions should be in English and proposals should clearly state the aims, methods and findings of the article proposed.

Abstracts should be emailed to Fiona Measham (f.measham@durham.ac.uk) and to Amy Pennay (amy.pennay@turningpoint.org.au) by 1 December 2014. The email subject heading should read "DEPP Special Issue: The Normalisation Thesis – 20 years later". The editors will inform authors by 16th January 2015 whether to proceed to full submission. If selected, complete manuscripts will be due on 1st May 2015. All manuscripts will be subject to the normal DEPP peer review process. The special issue will be published in mid 2016.

Measham, F., Newcombe, R. & Parker, H. (1994) The normalisation of recreational drug use amongst young people in north-west England. British Journal of Sociology, 45(2): 287-312.

Parker, H., Aldridge, J. & Measham, F. (1998) Illegal Leisure: The normalisation of adolescent drug use, London: Routledge.

Academic, Health Services Researcher, Policy Analyst, Public Health Expert, Public Health Worker, Public Servant, Social Scientist
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health: Understudied Populations
01/31/2015
Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health: Understudied Populations

Deadline for submission is January 31, 2015.

Sexual and reproductive health services are most effective when tailored to the specific circumstances of particular populations. To that end, much research and programmatic effort has gone toward understanding the behaviors and service needs of teenagers, members of racial and ethnic minority groups, and socioeconomically disadvantaged men and women. Other groups, however, have received less attention: individuals with disabilities, incarcerated persons, homeless men and women, military personnel and transgender people, to name but a few. The December 2015 issue of Perspectives on Sexual and Reproductive Health will include a special section devoted to exploring the sexual and reproductive health needs of understudied populations—those mentioned above and others whose distinctive situations have been largely overlooked in the literature and in the policy and service arenas. We will consider original research and review articles (with a maximum length of 6,000 words), as well as commentaries (up to 3,500 words).

Academic, Community Activist, Health Services Researcher, Policy Analyst, Public Health Expert, Public Health Worker, Public Servant, Social Scientist
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Sex Education: The Media’s Evolving Role in Sex Education
10/24/2014
Sex Education

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of Sex Education: The Media’s Evolving Role in Sex Education

Guest Editors: Alan McKee, Sara Bragg, and Tristan Taormino

The entertainment media have long been identified as having a key role to play in education about sex and relationships.

All too often, however, in studies of sexual learning the media have been assessed for their potentially negative effects on young people. For example, studies have correlated consumption of particular media forms with early sexual intercourse or teenage pregnancy, while parents and schools have been seen as providing a positive corrective.

Empirical research shows that this simple binary is not always accurate: in some instances entertainment media may offer positive information and representations while school or parents often offer more moralizing or conservative perspectives.  For example, a young person growing up in a homophobic family may see happy queer characters in a sitcom; or young people attending a school that emphasizes young women’s role as gatekeepers and controllers of men’s sexuality may find helpful TV dramas that explore women’s active sexual agency.

This Special Issue of the journal Sex Education will engage with these and related concerns, pausing to take stock of where we are now, especially with respect to the positive role that old and newer forms of media can play in learning about sex.

Papers may focus on any aspect of the entertainment media, and on any aspect of healthy sexual development – including, but not limited to, open communication about sex, assertiveness, sexual agency, sexual identity, or an acceptance that sex can be pleasurable.

Submission Procedures

Submission Deadline: 24th October, 2014

Articles for the Special Issue will be subject to normal peer review in line with the procedures of the journal. For more information on how to submit your paper, please visit the instructions for authors tab on the journal website.

When you submit your paper will be asked whether you are submitting for a Special Issue. Please use the pull-down menu to note that you are submitting your paper for the Special Issue The Media’s Evolving Role in Sex Education. Please also note in the manuscript of your article that you are submitting it for this Special Issue.

If you are not sure whether your article is appropriate for this Special Issue, please feel free to send an abstract in the first instance to Alan McKee.

Academic, Health Educator, Health Services Researcher, Public Health Expert, Social Scientist
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Behavioral Medicine in the Asia Pacific
12/15/2014
International Journal of Behavioral Medicine

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the International Journal of Behavioral Medicine: Behavioral Medicine in the Asia Pacific

Deadline: The submission deadline is 15 December 2014.

Original, empirical studies and literature reviews are encouraged. Questions regarding the special issue should be directed to Akihito Shimazu, ashimazu@m.u-tokyo.ac.jp

Academic, Behavioral Scientist, Psychologist, Public Health Expert, Social Scientist
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Marketing Channels: Food Safety and Food Security: Challenges and Opportunities
12/31/2014
Journal of Marketing Channels

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Marketing Channels: Food Safety and Food Security: Challenges and Opportunities

Guest Editors:

Xenophon Koufteros, Texas A&M University

Guanyi Lu, Oregon State University

The Journal of Marketing Channels is pleased to announce and invite submissions for a Special Issue on “Food Safety and Food Security: Challenges and Opportunities”. The deadline for manuscript submission is December 31, 2014 with publication of accepted papers planned during late 2015 or early 2016.

As supply chains now span the globe and outsourcing has become ubiquitous, firms find that they have little direct control over the production of all of the materials that enter their supply chain. This involves necessarily some level of risk if the quality and integrity of the materials have been compromised along the value chain, but not detected prior to product production and delivery to end customers. Also, firms have to ensure that their internal processes and distribution channels are capable of producing and delivering safe products to their customers.

Protecting the supply chain is, however, quite germane to some industries, such as that of food and beverage (F&B), because their products are consumed by the public: products that have been compromised have the potential to cause illness and, in some cases, death. This of course will likely have adverse financial effects on the company and tarnish its reputation. These effects on the company can be rather tangible and may be felt in a short period of time despite recovery attempts and honest efforts to reassure the public.

We welcome manuscripts that are (1) theoretically innovative and well-grounded in theory and (2) based on solid empirical research which provides insights into the dynamics of practices in the F&B industries. Manuscripts which do not rest on strong theoretical grounds or do not engage in theory building will be desk rejected.

Empirical research which tends to be longitudinal in nature is strongly encouraged.

A Special Editorial Review Board will be convened by the Guest Editors for this Special Issue of JMC. However, the reviewing process will follow the same norms as those of the regular editorial team.

Some examples of research that would be welcomed include:

• Encouraging scholarly interest in the growing complexity and dangers that underlie global F&B supply chains.

• Examining the implications of these dangers for the firm and the public at large.

• Learning more about the role of increasing global interdependence among supply chain members.

• Uncovering best practices to assure the integrity of products in the F&B industries.

• Uncovering the type of processes/practices other industries employ to ensure safety and security which may be transferable to the F&B industries.

• Considering relevant performance metrics.

• Examining the differential effects of key practices on relevant performance metrics.

• Studying how firms might recover from crisis attributed to F&B safety/security breaches.

• Examining whether the cultural and ethical environment at the firm level and/or at the country level play a role in F&B safety and security.

• Studying whether organizational structure plays a role in F&B safety and security.

• Researching the role of international standards, such as ISO, in promoting F&B safety and security.

• Considering if and how government regulations impact F&B safety/security over time.

Academic, Policy Analyst, Public Health Expert, Public Servant, Social Scientist

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