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6 calls for papers / publications listed in Law 

Call for Papers for a Theme Issue of Epidemiologic Reviews: Gun Violence: Risk, Consequences, and Prevention
12/15/2014
Epidemiologic Reviews

Call for Papers for a Theme Issue of Epidemiologic Reviews: Gun Violence: Risk, Consequences, and Prevention

Epidemiologic Reviews, a sister publication of the American Journal of Epidemiology, is devoted to publishing comprehensive and critical reviews on specific themes once a year. For the last several years, Epidemiologic Reviews has ranked #1 or #2 in impact factor out of about 160 journals. The theme of the 2016 issue will be Gun Violence: Risk, Consequences, and Prevention.

Submission of review articles is now solicited on content and method topics for this theme. Examples include the relationship between gun laws and homicide, the risk attributed to mental illness, suicide risk attributed to availability and accessibility of guns, the role of guns in domestic violence, the relationship between substance abuse and gun violence, trends in emergency medical response and case-fatality rates, risk factors and prevention of mass shooting, peer influences on perpetration and victimization risks, efficacy of law enforcement interventions directed at gun violence, and community and societal characteristics associated with risk for gun violence. Please note that reviews on other epidemiologic aspects of gun violence are also welcome.

Manuscripts can be up to 6,000 words exclusive of the abstract, tables, figures, and references. All papers must be reviews of studies that are mostly epidemiologic in nature; a report of a single study is not acceptable. Give explicit details of the method of literature search, and use systematic reviews or meta-analysis whenever possible.

Consult the journal website for acceptable format:
http://www.oxfordjournals.org/our_journals/epirev/about.html

Authors are encouraged to submit abstracts by December 15, 2014, to allow for early editorial input. Abstracts should be emailed to the editor-in-chief (mibrahi1@jhu.edu). Complete manuscripts are due March 2, 2015; these may be submitted even if abstracts have not been sent. Submit manuscripts online at http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/epirev

Academic, Behavioral Scientist, Epidemiologist, Forsensic Scientist, Physician Researcher, Policy Analyst, Psychiatrist, Psychologist, Public Health Expert, Public Health Worker, Public Servant, Social Scientist
Call for Papers: The Journal of Science and Law
12/31/2014
Journal of Science and Law

Call for Papers: The Journal of Science and Law

As an online, open-access journal, JSciLaw aspires to be at the forefront of research that bridges disciplines and uses large-scale data analysis to influence public policy. Additionally, it is actively seeking to publish scholars at every stage in their career. Please consider JSciLaw for your next paper.

Many of today’s policy questions require an interdisciplinary approach, drawing from fields such as neuroscience, biology, and statistics. Researchers today are presented with new technologies to gather data and novel techniques for data mining. However, innovative scholarship often fails to leave its subspecialty and reach an interdisciplinary audience, dulling its impact and preventing other disciplines from capitalizing on new findings.The Journal of Science and Law (JSciLaw) seeks to address this problem as an interdisciplinary publication that provides a forum for scholarship at the intersection of scientific research and legal policy. JSciLaw aims to unite disciplines and to encourage collaboration between scientific researchers, legal scholars, and policy makers. Reflecting its interdisciplinary nature, the JSciLaw editorial board includes scholars from the fields of neuroscience, law, criminology, statistics, and policy.

JSciLaw promotes top-tier, peer-reviewed scientific research that matters for policy decisions. Reflecting that mission, we are pioneering in-house journal software that allows JSciLaw to incorporate large-scale data directly into its manuscripts, such that reported results are replicable and extensible. In this way, readers are not forced to simply believe the claims of research papers published in JSciLaw, but can analyze the data themselves.

The journal is open-access, with all articles available for free at JSciLaw.org. Because we are an online journal, we are de-emphasizing word limits in deference to quality: articles should be as long as they need to be (but no longer). We publish Original Research Articles, Reviews, Opinions, and occasionally, Book Reviews. Papers are published on a rolling basis as soon as they are accepted.

JSciLaw encourages you to submit your innovative research and to explore our research articles in the future. If you have any questions, you can contact the editorial board at editors@jscilaw.org.

David M. Eagleman, PhD
Editor-in-Chief
Director, Initiative on Neuroscience and Law
Department of Neuroscience, Baylor College of Medicine

Academic, Biostatistician, Neuroscientist, Physician Researcher, Policy Analyst, Scientist
Call for Papers: Journal of Law & Health’s Annual Symposium: The Social, Ethical, and Legal Consequences of Sports-Related Brain Injuries
11/30/2014
Cleveland - Marshall College of Law Journal of Law and Health

Call for Papers: Journal of Law & Health Annual Symposium: The Social, Ethical, and Legal Consequences of Sports-Related Brain Injuries

You are invited to submit an Article for possible inclusion in the Journal of Law & Health’s Annual Symposium: The Social, Ethical, and Legal Consequences of Sports-Related Brain Injuries. The Journal of Law & Health is a student-run publication dedicated to publishing innovative articles that offer diverse perspectives on the intersection between law, health, and medicine.

The selection of the Symposium topic was a result of the myriad of new research on the prevalence of traumatic brain injuries in sports and the long-term health consequences that result from head injuries.

Further, high profile legal disputes, such as the NFL’s $765 million settlement with retired players, has thrust the discussion of brain injuries in sports into the legal arena as well.

The Symposium aims to facilitate a well-rounded discussion between, judges, legislators, academics, and medical professional on the social, ethical, and legal issues that may occur as more research becomes available on brain injuries in sports.

Areas of interest for this special journal issue include, but are not limited to, the following topics:

1. The sociological impact of sports in American culture.

2. The impact of brain injuries on developing brains of youth and collegiate athletes.

3. The relationship between brain injuries and psychological disorders.

4. The state of the law and the current legal landscape regarding brain injuries in sports.

5. The future direction of the law regulating brain injuries and legislative responsibility with regard to protecting athletes from brain injuries.

Submissions

Please submit a 600-word abstract describing your topic and a copy of your curriculum vitae by November 30, 2014 to Journal of Law and Health at n.m.vento@cmlaw.csuohio.edu and j.gatta@cmlaw.csuohio.edu

Please include “Submission: Annual Symposium” in the subject line. The symposium is tentatively scheduled for March 2015.

Academic, Bioethicist, Ethicist, Law Student, Lawyer, Neurologist, Neuroscientist, Physician Researcher, Policy Analyst, Public Health Expert, Public Servant, Social Scientist
Call for Submissions: Journal of Law and the Biosciences
10/31/2014
Journal of Law and the Biosciences

Call for Submissions: Journal of Law and the Biosciences

The Journal of Law and the Biosciences (JLB) is actively soliciting original manuscripts, responses, essays, and book reviews devoted to the examination of issues related to the intersection of law and biosciences, including bioethics, neuroethics, genetics, reproductive technologies, stem cells, enhancement, patent law, and food and drug regulation. JLB welcomes submissions of varying length, with a theoretical, empirical, practical, or policy oriented focus.

JLB is the first fully open access peer-reviewed legal journal focused on the advances at the intersection of law and the biosciences. A co-venture between Duke University, Harvard Law School, and Stanford University, and published by Oxford University Press, this open access, online, and interdisciplinary academic journal publishes cutting-edge scholarship in this important new field. JLB is published as one volume with three issues per year with new articles posted online on an ongoing basis.

Bioethicist, Geneticist , Lawyer, Policy Analyst, Public Health Expert
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Forensic Practice: Investigative Interviewing: Investigation and Probative Value
01/31/2015
Journal of Forensic Practice

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the Journal of Forensic Practice: Investigative Interviewing: Investigation and Probative Value

Guest editorsDr Becky Milne and Professor Ray Bull
University of Portsmouth, UK

About the editionInvestigative interviewing is at the heart of any investigation and thus is the root of achieving justice in society. Thus it is one of the most important tools in an investigator’s tool box. As a result, over the past 20 years practitioners and researchers have sought, and in some countries have substantially succeeded, in developing procedures that improve the quality of interviews of witnesses, victims, and suspects of crime. This body of work has seen successful outcomes of the interplay between academic research and practical policing.

This special issue aims to outline recent developments in this field and focuses upon the practical aspects of interviewing in an investigation and the courts.

While all submissions will be considered, the following are likely to be of particular interest to this issue.

1. Recent developments for interviewing witnesses, victims and suspects.

2. The application of interviewing methods in the field.

3. Examination of interviewing issues in court.

Submission criteriaSubmissions must be in the range of 5,000 to 7,000 words (including references).

See the full author guidelines: http://www.emeraldgrouppublishing.com/products/journals/author_guidelines.htm?id=jfp

Submit your paper to this issue at: http://mc.manuscriptcentral.com/jofp

(NB Please ensure that you submit to the special issue on 'investigative interviewing'.)

Deadline for submissions: 31 January 2015

Academic, Behavioral Scientist, Forsensic Scientist, Lawyer, Psychologist, Public Servant
Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics: Health and Ecological Destruction: Fracking and Beyond
09/01/2015
International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics

Call for Papers for a Special Issue of the International Journal of Feminist Approaches to Bioethics: Health and Ecological Destruction: Fracking and Beyond

The deadline for submission for this issue is September 1, 2015.

Laura Purdy and Wendy Lynne Lee

“Which questions moral philosophers choose to study—and choose not to study—is itself a moral issue,” wrote Virginia Warren in her groundbreaking 1979 article. Indeed, bioethics has often focused on important, but relatively narrow issues based on the assumption that health is a natural lottery and that the chief moral questions have to do with the quality of care, and fair access to it, or with the implications of new technologies to treat or cure, and questions about reproduction and death. Of course, some writing has always acknowledged many influences on health and thus longevity, encouraged, no doubt, by scholarship in epidemiology, the social determinants of health, interest in food/agriculture issues, and concern about occupational and environmental pollution.

This special issue of IJFAB aims to examine, through a feminist lens, human activities such as fracking, that, by negatively impacting the environment, threaten health.

Science fiction, such as Cormac McCarthy’s The Road, abounds with post-apocalyptic nightmares, but rarely devotes any attention to how they came about or whether they could have been prevented.

Yet, as ever more paths to environmental disaster are opened up by corporate and governmental decisions, the preventable is being touted as inevitable, natural, and good.

Many of us now live in disbelief at the deliberate dismantling of the conditions required for human (and nonhuman) flourishing by people apparently oblivious or disdainful of the consequences. If these forces continue to prevail, it is only a matter of time before the consequences of widespread lack of access to clean water, air and land pollution, desertification, and deforestation, will drastically reduce human life spans, and quite possibly lead to human extinction. The process will exacerbate the fight for survival at all levels, from the individual to the national.

We encourage readers to think about the many ways human activities are putting at risk human health, shortening lives, and risking species suicide.

Possible Topics:

Basic Theories/Concepts:

• Public good vs. Property Rights

• Precautionary Principle vs. Cost/Risk/Benefit

• Environment/Ecology

• Industrialized extraction

• Feminist environmental bioethics

• Thriveability/Flourishing

Focus:

• Climate Change

• Energy Production Policy

• Food/Agriculture Issues

• Environmental/Health Legislation

• Drugs (Legal and Illegal)

• Exploitation of Public Assets

• Wildlife Preservation

Our main goal is to evaluate the health consequences of activities intended to maintain and expand dependence on fossil fuels, and technology in general, especially that held to be necessary for sustaining rapidly growing populations, no matter at what cost to the environment. These goals, in turn, reflect the needs and interests of continued western hegemony. We encourage potential contributors to contact us for a more detailed description of possible topics. In addition, we hope for submissions on the many related topics not listed here, such as mountain top removal, tar sands development, or as yet unidentified threats.

Academic, Bioethicist, Community Activist, Ethicist, Philosopher, Policy Analyst, Public Health Expert, Social Scientist